About my blog

Climate City Campus develops multidisciplinary student projects together with students, researchers and partners that use the Delft University of Technology campus as a living lab for climate research and sustainable solutions in an urban environment.

Disclaimer

De meningen ge-uit door medewerkers en studenten van de TU Delft en de commentaren die zijn gegeven reflecteren niet perse de mening(en) van de TU Delft. De TU Delft is dan ook niet verantwoordelijk voor de inhoud van hetgeen op de TU Delft weblogs zichtbaar is. Wel vindt de TU Delft het belangrijk - en ook waarde toevoegend - dat medewerkers en studenten op deze, door de TU Delft gefaciliteerde, omgeving hun mening kunnen geven.

Climate City Campus

TU Delft Environment Initiative

Real-time monitoring of the Campus

The proposed project is about monitoring urban flows.

Aim and outline:

– Perform outdoor measurements.

– Estimate how many sensors are needed and where they should be placed. Make a combination with radar data.

 Utilization:

– Improvement urban flow models.

– Providing input data to urban heat transport, real-time air pollution forecasting and water evaporation.

Starting date: beginning of 2013.

Perform experimental validation of the computed Campus flow

The proposed project is about measuring urban flows to study how pollution is transported to urban environments.

Aim and outline:

– Measurements can be carried out on a scale model of the TUD Campus in the water tunnel of Laboratory for Aero & Hydrodynamics (3ME).

– Use state-of-the-art laser based technique (PIV) to acquire the flow velocity distribution.

– Variables to be assessed: wind speed and wind direction.

– Compare experimental results with the simulations.

Utilization:

– Validation of urban flow models.

– Predict dispersion of air pollution through campus.

– Identification of wind hot-spots.

– Define how many measurement points are needed to represent flow in the entire campus.

– Optimize your cycle route to the lectures.

Main tasks:

1.     Produce the model and install it into tunnel.

2.     Complete the set-up measurement system.

3.     Take measurements.

4.     Data processing and evaluation. 

Group size: 1-2 students
Starting date: June 2012.

Out-of-the-box roof top utilisation

If you look around the TU Delft Campus many of the rooftops are flat. Until now, they remain unutilized while they also offer an opportunity to contribute to a more sustainable and eye-catching campus. Flat rooftops can be used to preserve the environment, to conserve or produce energy, to extend service life and to improve health. Flat rooftops can also be utilized to improve the image of a building and its surroundings, for example by demonstrating pilot projects. The building of Industrial Design Engineering (IDE) has a large flat surface, and for this rooftop the faculty wants to determine viable and feasible options for utilization of this flat surface. The goals of this project are to investigate: the (technical) possibilities for using the rooftop, the effects of these possibilities and the cost and return of these possibilities. Finally, students should recommend the best option for IDE rooftop utilization.

Responsible students: Nick Spook (TNW), Thijs Cui (TNW), Mathijs Rozemuller (TNW)

Supervisors: Annemarie Mink (IO), Cecile Cuijpers (IO)

Web-enabling the TU Delft’s sensors

There are several sensors on campus (which measure for instance the wind direction/speed, the temperature, the humidity, etc) but very few are web-enabled. That is, they are at best connected to one computer but they do not broadcast in real-time the data they collect. This project aims at solving this problem. First, an inventory of the different kinds of sensors on campus must be done and the standards that could be used to link the sensors to the web must be investigated. Second, an implementation of the chosen standard for one (or more) sensor(s) must be done so that everyone can view and/or download in real-time the latest data. It is also expected that the results of this project will be used for new sensors that will be installed on campus in the future.

Responsible student: Heming Zhang – EWI

Supervisor: Marianne de Vries – OTB

Next CCC-meeting

The next CCC-meeting will be held in March 30th 15.00-17.00 at room CiTG 2.66.

 

The agenda of this meeting is:

 

·       Presentation on “Soil moisture estimation using Distributed Temperature Sensing” given by Susan Steele-Dunne (CiTG). A question session will follow regarding possible student projects.

·       Presentation on the recently constructed Discover Climate Application by Alenka Princic (TUD

      library). Alenka will give an overview of the current functions supported by the application and inform about further expansion of the application so as to be used by Delft Climate Institute, Climate City Campus and Delft Environment Initiative.

·      Project proposals for validating DisTUrbE model in the campus by Gerrit Elsinga. Possible topics:

1.        Implementing air flow measurements close to buildings of unconventional/ unusual shape or other urban spots that are difficult to simulate.

2.        Building a mini-campus and importing it to the model’s wind or water tunnel.

·       Discussing the evolution of Climate City Campus lectures and projects under the Honours Programme Bachelor Interfacultair.

Next CCC-meeting

The next CCC-meeting will be held in March 30th 15.00-17.00 at room CiTG 2.66.

 

The agenda of this meeting is:

 

·       Presentation on “Soil moisture estimation using Distributed Temperature Sensing” given by Susan Steele-Dunne (CiTG). A question session will follow regarding possible student projects.

 

·       Presentation on the recently constructed Discover Climate Application by Alenka Princic (TUD

      library). Alenka will give an overview of the current functions supported by the application and inform about further expansion of the application so as to be used by Delft Climate Institute, Climate City Campus and Delft Environment Initiative.

 

·      Project proposals for validating DisTUrbE model in the campus by Gerrit Elsinga. Possible topics:

1.        Implementing air flow measurements close to buildings of unconventional/ unusual shape or other urban spots that are difficult to simulate.

2.        Building a mini-campus and importing it to the model’s wind or water tunnel.

 

·       Discussing the evolution of Climate City Campus lectures and projects under the Honours Programme Bachelor Interfacultair.

Climate City Campus Lectures

Honours Programme Bachelor Interfacultair offers a lecture series about Climate Change & Extreme Weather issues !

Delft Environment Lecture Series II

This Wednesday the second Delft Environment Initiative Lecture will take place:

André Faaij (Utrecht University/BE-Basic, IPCC Lead Author on Energy Systems) – ‘Renewable Energy Technologies – IPCC and beyond’

21 December 2011 | 16:00 – 21 December 2011 | 17:00
Place: Science Centre Delft

In 2008, André Faaij (Utrecht University/BE-Basic) joined the IPCC team as Convening Lead Author to draft the Special Report on Renewable Energy as well as the new Global Energy Assessment (GEA). Currently, he is Lead Author on Energy Systems for the IPCC 5th assessment report. In this guest lecture, Faaij will build on insights from the Special Report on Renewable Energy, and he will discuss the outlook for deployment of different renewable energy technologies (RET’s).

For more information: http://tudelft.nl/en/research/environment/agenda/event/detail/renewable-energy-technologies-ipcc-and-beyond/

 

Minutes from CCC-meetings

The next Climate City Campus meeting is close

Date: December 8, 2011
Time: 15.00-17.00
Place: CiTG 2.66

The agenda of this meeting is:
·     Presentation on “A repository for CCC created by the TUD library” given by Paul Suijker (product developer in TUD library). The presentation will be followed by a discussion on this possibility.
·     Presentation on “DisTUrbE (DISpersion by Turbulence in the URBan Environment) project” given by Gerrit Elsinga (3ME). A question session will follow.

© 2011 TU Delft